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Why our Nonprofit, A-Squared LAMP Groups, Exists, part 1

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Personal managment means it is YOUR responsibility to develop yourself professionally.  Self-development and success is a discipline that is developed through relationship and accountability - something that is not mentioned directly in the VIDEO below, but is implied in its arguments.  Many who struggle to embrace this reality are millennials, but some are also much older.

A-Squared LAMP Groups does exactly that. We work one-on-one with people and teams to guide them into defining and developing their roap map forward. Research has proven it to be successful more than any other type of development. Self-help, for example, is a $12 billion industry that fails 100% of the time, according to marketing research, which is why it is the so lucrative. It relies on its failure. People inevitably lose faith in one self-help method or guru only to embrace (and buy) the next...and the next...

So why does the nonprofit A-Squared LAMP Groups exist?

Reason # 1: We are dedicated to bringing personal and professional coaching to people who are lacking or don't see the need for "soft" skills that are proven to directly impact their performance in life and work. It relates immediately to their own personal and professional satisfaction and joy, as well as a sense of self-worth and contribution to others!

Sign up yourself, Make a pledge or contribute for others, or Get involved to help us in our work. Read on.

 

Background of employment trends. In early days of business practices, an employee might stay employed at his or her company for their entire working life with the expectation that the company will indicate their contribution and intentionally develop them professionally and take care of their future in retirement. Those days are long gone.

Entering the workforce during that stark transition circa 1960s are the Boomer generation - and for the first time in larger numbers, women. Boomers embraced the independence of being in control of themselves, but learned to manage their professional lives by adding more and more experience to their professional toolbox and changing companies to artificially increase salary, satisfaction, or advancement in the peak of their careers.  The result over time is an average time span of an employee stay in a single company today being between 2 -5 years - too short for a company to want to invest in someone meaningfully, or to want and afford to.  And the market has adjusted to this reality, so salary comparisons and communication across fields limit this company-jumping salary and advancement boom, also reducing satisfaction employees get from such jumps.

"On-the-job experience was important 50 years ago. Employers did invest in training of their employees and the whole apprenticeship system was more significant and more invested in by employers than it has been now." – Professor John Spoehr, Exec Dir of Australian Institute of Social Research

The next generation of the workforce entered into it in the late 1970s and 1980s focused heavily on education and training on the front-end of their careers utilizing efforts to ensure that they chose or created an amazing place to work so that they would stay motivated to remain there.

However, the high cost of education has quickly outstripped the associated career salaries in many of the fields of focus.  Also, the lag time between educational responses to the market leaves huge holes in the competencies with students studying past paradigms as models that may or may not be relevant when they enter the market.  When many minimum requirements for work include college degrees, it is hard to stand out as an employee, and it made companies look for something more: experience and refined soft skills.

Perhaps in an effort for more longevity of impact, workers in the 1990s, both new and seasoned corporate workers, began an exodus for nonprofit and religious organizations to seek more "meaningful" work.  While this may have been a great solution for some, many came to the realization that nonprofits are also run like businesses if they are to be successful, and the same personal and interactive skills are needed to navigate those realms. Others embraced the emerging technological "age" of website, Internet, digital, and computer skills. Now that technology has "normalized" across many fields and in the public-at-large, the new minimum standard of knowledge for most jobs negates all but the most technologically invested talents whose job it is to manage it as their sole job. So many thousands of systems and platforms and languages and devices has meant that finding the right relevant training to stay competitive became somewhat diffuse by the mid-2000s. Must one be an expert accounting technology to be an expert accountant? The lines became blurred. After all, searching information on Yahoo or Google or Bing is great, but it always begins on the premise that you already know what you need. What if you don't?

The 2000-2010 workforce has seen many choosing a home business or starting a small business idea; but they often don't even know that they lack the needed skills to be successful in sustaining their entrepreneurial efforts. Nearly 80% of all businesses are closed by their tenth year, with the primary reasons being mismanagement, incompetent practices, imbalanced expertise, or little business experience. Sometimes talented workers hurt their own professional confidence by starting a good business with passion and having it fail on them while they are believing for its success. They may not even know that they lack the necessary hard and soft skills to realize its full potential in a larger market. This is where A-Squared LAMP Groups comes in and helps. We start with YOU.

Effective career management strategies must include one-on-one development that coaching provides. Career management strategies can increasingly become an ongoing empty compensation for the effort to develop an internal and interactive skills set that can sap one's energy and resources to stay on top. The most effective use of both energy and resources is to take the time to define and navigate the kind of daily success and on-going satisfaction in one's job that is craved.

Today millennials, senior citizens, out-of-work or transitioning mid-career professionals, or stay-at-home mothers looking to enter the workforce in a new more successful and fulfilling way are being successfully helped by A-Squared LAMP Groups. One at a time. Success by success. Planted into more meaningful communities of support and success.

article 2      article 3

sources: http://career-advice.careerone.com.au/job-hunting-strategy/employment-news/how-work-changed-since-1960s/article.aspx, http://www.cornellhrreview.org/changing-demands-the-workforce-of-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow, http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/06/key-findings-about-the-american-workforce-and-the-changing-job-market,http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2016/04/29/how-the-knowledge-economy-delays-adulthood/books/readings, http://www.nonprofitpro.com/article/80-nonprofit-trends-for-2016/all/

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